The Burrowers

The Burrowers

Westerns are a genre that has been transformed many times over but it has rarely crossed paths with horror. In this movie, The Searchers becomes a monster flick. The Stewart family is taken overnight from their homestead and everyone assumes the menacing natives took them. The eldest daughter’s Irish boyfriend, Coffey (Karl Geary), joins up […]

Westerns are a genre that has been transformed many times over but it has rarely crossed paths with horror. In this movie, The Searchers becomes a monster flick.

The Stewart family is taken overnight from their homestead and everyone assumes the menacing natives took them. The eldest daughter’s Irish boyfriend, Coffey (Karl Geary), joins up with a search party of ranchers and cavalrymen (William Mapother, Sean Patrick Thomas, Clancy Brown and Doug Hutchison), determined to bring her back alive. Only none of the men realize the natives are not the worst of their worries anymore. Not knowing what he’s up against or how to stop it, Coffey realizes his only option is to cooperate.

The film’s dialogue does not fit the time of the narrative, even though it makes it more accessible to a younger audience. A little more attention to authenticity in that area would have been appreciated. Thomas and Geary play well off of each other, providing the sarcastic comedy in the film.

The story’s final scenes are reminiscent of the end of George Romero’s Night of the Living Dead. Expansion would reveal too much but the horrific actions of human nature are centre stage.

Director J.T. Petty is a nature lover so he shoots insects in their habitat as well as uses our unconditional compassion for animals against us. Consequently, the monsters are a strange human, arachnid hybrid that lurk in the night. In addition to their unique hideousness, their stealth and quickness contribute to the terror they evoke.

In the end, Petty appears to be trying to please too many people, weakening the impact of the picture.