New on DVD: The Riches – Season 2

New on DVD: The Riches – Season 2

In a society where the American Dream (or your country’s equivalent) is still the most coveted lifestyle, The Riches emerged as a family willing to do anything to attain fantasy. Season one saw the tightly-knit, grifter, gypsy family drift further apart as their patriarch Wayne Malloy a.k.a. Doug Rich (Eddie Izzard) lost himself in his […]


In a society where the American Dream (or your country’s equivalent) is still the most coveted lifestyle, The Riches emerged as a family willing to do anything to attain fantasy.

Season one saw the tightly-knit, grifter, gypsy family drift further apart as their patriarch Wayne Malloy a.k.a. Doug Rich (Eddie Izzard) lost himself in his new role as corporate lawyer and six-digit earner. What began as a quick get rich scheme became a muddled affair that only got worse with each passing day. Season two began with blackmail, murder and a dash back to the RV that brought them to Eden Falls. But having been out of the traveler’s game and living in the lap of luxury, going back proved too hard. Wayne suggests they go back to Eden Falls, clean up the mess and commit to one last great con that could earn them enough money to stop conning and running forever. They decide to risk it but the effects it has on the family are possibly irreversible. Additionally, other than keeping their stories straight, the Malloys must also handle the on-going threat of cousin Dale and the return of a frightening adversary called Quinn.

This season, the characters struggle with the idea of freedom and its connection to money. “The minute you get what you think you want, you always want more.” This sentiment runs throughout the series, but becomes especially significant this season as various members of the family decide if this is the lifestyle they really want and what they are willing to do to keep it or escape it.

Unfortunately, The Riches is one of the many shows that fell victim to the writer’s strike. First the season was cut from 13 to a mere seven episodes, and then the show’s cancellation was quietly announced a few months later. And I say “unfortunately” because it was a good series that ended too soon. The content was edgier than the average dramatic series, which would explain its spot on Canada’s Showcase – “television without borders.” But the show’s abandonment by networks means the characters will never finish their tale, which is like reading a great book and discovering the final chapter is incomplete. Nonetheless, if you enjoy smart television and can handle the everlasting cliff-hanger, it’s definitely worth checking out.

When compared to the season one DVD release, season two’s special features are dismal – possibly reflecting the disappointment of the series’ termination. The sole extra is “Eddie Izzard: Revealed,” a featurette of interview clips with Izzard and series creator Dmitry Lipkin. Izzard explores his transition from comedian to dramatic lead and his thoughts on doing the show, which he ironically hopes runs for six or seven seasons.