New on DVD: The Boondock Saints II: All Saints Day

New on DVD: The Boondock Saints II: All Saints Day

A follow-up to The Boondock Saints was highly anticipated, which made it really unfortunate writer/director Troy Duffy couldn’t stick to the formula that had hooked everyone all those years ago, instead opting for a weak music video-style. Reunited with their father (Billy Connolly) after a 25-year absence, the three men are laying low on a […]


A follow-up to The Boondock Saints was highly anticipated, which made it really unfortunate writer/director Troy Duffy couldn’t stick to the formula that had hooked everyone all those years ago, instead opting for a weak music video-style.

Reunited with their father (Billy Connolly) after a 25-year absence, the three men are laying low on a sheep ranch in Ireland when word arrives that a priest has been murdered and their signature left. They immediately return to Boston to right the wrong. On their way, they meet Romeo (Clifton Collins Jr.) who knows them by reputation and fills the role of sidekick for the remainder of the film. Along the way, Connor (Sean Patrick Flanery) and Murphy (Norman Reedus) realize this calling out is steeped in a lot of history and the final playing out of this game of revenge will be brutal.

Firstly, Duffy skips ahead in the sequel order of events to what would usually occur in a third installment – tying events to the past – but the inclusion of Peter Fonda makes it forgivable. The rest however is not.

Duffy’s interpretation of a strong female character (Julie Benz) looks like she just walked out of an ’80s hair-band rock video, complete with stiletto heels and cleavage. In what world could she be a respected FBI special agent? On the other hand, her parallel as Agent Paul Smecker’s protégé is simultaneously clever and annoying. Possibly the film’s worst departure from the original is the addition of absurd fantasy sequences that in no way complement the narrative. For example, a montage, or “mantage” as it’s been dubbed, resembles a patriotic beer commercial in which the guys appear in various locations declaring their manhood. Though “The Saints” are as charming as ever, most of the police dialogue is laughable as they’re made to sound even less intelligent than before. Duffy may have called them “improvements” and “curve balls,” but these fundamental changes take from all that was likeable in the first film.

Special features include: a commentary with Duffy, Flanery, Reedus and Connolly and another with Duffy and Willem Dafoe (Agent Smecker); two deleted scenes; a behind the scenes featurette; and a 10-minute unedited discussion between Duffy and Connolly.