New on DVD: Sex and the City

New on DVD: Sex and the City

We spent six seasons with four women, feeling their pain, envying their fashion and revelling in their joy. We each had our favourite, which was not always the one we could most identify with, and reluctantly said goodbye when the final episode aired. Four years later, a reunion was set for the theatre nearest you […]

We spent six seasons with four women, feeling their pain, envying their fashion and revelling in their joy. We each had our favourite, which was not always the one we could most identify with, and reluctantly said goodbye when the final episode aired. Four years later, a reunion was set for the theatre nearest you – and now you can welcome them back into your living room.

Even after the fast forward, not much appears to have changed in the lives of Manhattan’s favourite women. Carrie (Sarah Jessica Parker) and Mr. Big (Chris Noth) are blissfully apartment hunting; Charlotte (Kristin Davis) is living out her fairy tale with Harry (Evan Handler) and their adopted daughter; Miranda (Cynthia Nixon) is balancing life as a mother, wife and lawyer in Brooklyn with Steve (David Eigenberg) and their son; and Samantha (Kim Cattrall) is still with actor Smith Jerrod (Jason Lewis) in Los Angeles. But, as always, the girls hit some bumps in the road; none more so than when Carrie and Big’s path leads them down the aisle.

Even the minor characters make appearances with Vogue editor Enid Frick (Candice Bergen), Carrie’s pal Stanford Blatch (Willie Garson), and hyper wedding planner Anthony Marentino (Mario Canton). Jennifer Hudson is added to the mix as Carrie’s personal assistant and reminder love still lives in New York. The clothes are more glamorous, the women older and more sophisticated and the emotions unbridled. You may not agree with the characters’ choices but they are true to the characters. You’ll laugh, you’ll cry and you’ll have the benefit of a more fitting goodbye than the series allotted.

The opening summary of each woman’s life firstly seems unnecessary because if you’re sitting through the two-and-a-half hour movie, you’ve almost definitely seen the television series; and secondly, summing up their lives in 50 words or less doesn’t do them justice.

When watching the extended cut, it is difficult to determine exactly what was not included in the theatrical version seen several months earlier. It turns out there were four scenes director/writer Michael Patrick Kring had to include in the DVD version of the film. They fit seamlessly, which is why it’s difficult to detect them, but the movie worked without them as well. The feature commentary by Kring elaborates on all the details from location to costume to story. In addition, it identifies the added moments and why they weren’t included originally.

The second disc of special features would not be complete without an 18-minute featurette about the fashion of Sex and the City. It also includes a conversation between Kring and Parker about the film; singer Fergie’s experience in the soundtrack studio; and four scenes that did not make either cut of the film, with or without commentary.