New on DVD: Mirrors

New on DVD: Mirrors

At some point, most of us have glanced something in a mirror only to see no trace of it a second later. Mirrors proposes that maybe that something wasn’t your imagination. While Officer Ben Carson (Kiefer Sutherland) is awaiting reinstatement, he gets a job as a night watchman at a burned-out department store. Strangely, the […]

At some point, most of us have glanced something in a mirror only to see no trace of it a second later. Mirrors proposes that maybe that something wasn’t your imagination.

While Officer Ben Carson (Kiefer Sutherland) is awaiting reinstatement, he gets a job as a night watchman at a burned-out department store. Strangely, the only thing to survive the fire unscathed is the numerous mirrors. Shortly after starting the position, Ben begins to notice brief abnormalities in his reflection. The situation quickly escalates to a life and death mission that not only affects his fate but also that of his family.

As has been true of most of the recent eerily disturbing horror movies, this is a remake of an Asian film from Korea. However, it is directed by someone who has already established a space for himself in the genre. Alexandre Aja first drew attention to the French horror movement with his unapologetically bloody High Tension. He then followed it up with a remake of 70’s horror flick Wes Craven’s The Hills Have Eyes.

In Mirrors, Aja once again demonstrates his understanding of and knack for the genre. While it’s not a river of blood, it does have some particularly gory moments. On the other hand, it tends to focus on the creepiness of a reflection that has taken on a life of its own. The threat is further extended by the fact that reflective surfaces are inescapable. To that extent, the filmmakers’ ability to shoot in the vicinity of so many mirrors without being seen is a feat in itself.

The DVD contains both a theatrical and unrated version of the film; with nearly equal runtimes, the difference lies in the amount of blood. The “making of” featurette is 48-minutes and covers most aspects of the production, including special effects via interviews with Greg Nicotero and the difficulties of shooting in such a revealing environment. ”Behind the Mirrors” is an interesting look at the folklore, mythology and occult beliefs surrounding mirrors. Finally, there are seven deleted scenes, which are more expositional than was necessary for the feature, and an alternate ending, which takes the punch out of the conclusion. They can be played with or without commentary.