New on DVD: Franklyn

New on DVD: Franklyn

Franklyn is a piece-it-together mystery that unfolds gradually with a little steampunk thrown in. The story opens on a post-apocalyptic city guarded by a masked avenger named John Priest (Ryan Phillippe), as he prepares to rescue an 11-year-old girl kidnapped by a man known only as “The Individual.” The next segment introduces audiences to Milo […]


Franklyn is a piece-it-together mystery that unfolds gradually with a little steampunk thrown in.

The story opens on a post-apocalyptic city guarded by a masked avenger named John Priest (Ryan Phillippe), as he prepares to rescue an 11-year-old girl kidnapped by a man known only as “The Individual.” The next segment introduces audiences to Milo (Sam Riley), a delusional young man who has been newly dumped by his cheating fiancé. Then we see a heated counselling session between a suicidal artist named Emilia (Eva Green) and her mother, who can only agree they irritate each other incessantly. Finally, the last entry shows Peter (Bernard Hill), a father awaiting the homecoming of his son. The connection between these tales is unclear, but as the narrative unfolds the pieces begin to fit together.

The alternate world in which Priest dwells is darkly stunning. The massive, gothic buildings that fill the skyline are beautiful and shown often. In addition, the bizarre prominence of religion and the necessity to belong is interesting, as is the variety of creeds to which people subscribe, such as “the seventh-day manicurists.” Though the character is a little Watchmen’s Rorschach-esque, it can be overlooked as the rest of the story provides a different context.

The acting is solid from everyone, though Phillippe’s British accent is weak – especially heard against the UK natives. Riley has a sincerity that allows him to be sweet and innocent despite the oddity of his situation. Green is entrancing as the tortured artist attempting to use the extremities of art to deal with her personal issues.

The DVD special features include: producer, director and cast interviews; a “making of” featurette; and three deleted scenes running under five minutes.