New on DVD: A Threesome with Kevin Smith

New on DVD: A Threesome with Kevin Smith

“A Threesome with Kevin Smith” sounds lewd in the context of his new theatrical release but it’s not – for the most part. Clerks was Smith’s feature directorial debut. He produced it on the cheap but his witty, realistic script has kept the film on the forefront of the indie radar. Dante (Brian O’Halloran) and […]

“A Threesome with Kevin Smith” sounds lewd in the context of his new theatrical release but it’s not – for the most part.

Clerks was Smith’s feature directorial debut. He produced it on the cheap but his witty, realistic script has kept the film on the forefront of the indie radar. Dante (Brian O’Halloran) and Randal (Jeff Anderson) are perpetual slackers. Dante works at a Quickstop convenience store and Randal feigns work at the video rental store next door. Dante is called in to work on his day off but must deal with one problem after another, most of which are personal. This film also introduced the duo of Jay and Silent Bob (Jason Mewes and Smith) to the world.

It took 12 years but Smith finally released the follow-up to his breakthrough picture. Clerks II picks up 10 years after the original and Dante (O’Halloran) and Randal (Anderson) have become “funployees” at a Mooby’s fast food restaurant. They continue to offend customers and debate anything and everything in addition to teasing their co-workers (Rosario Dawson and Trevor Fehrman). But when Dante announces he will be leaving New Jersey with his fiancée, Randal plans a going away party that no one will ever forget.

Chasing Amy was Smith’s final instalment of the “New Jersey Trilogy” and stars Ben Affleck before he got famous. Holden (Affleck) is a cult comic book artist along with his best friend and colourist Banky (Jason Lee). When they meet fellow artist (Joey Lauren Adams), Holden is instantly taken aback, only to be thwarted by her sexuality and his own self doubt. This is Smith’s best and most thoughtful exploration of relationships and perception.

Smith’s catalogue is funny, touching and thoughtful. While he does not boast to have the talent of a skilful filmmaker, what he has to say always comes through and everything else is secondary.

Each DVD has numerous special features including feature commentaries with Smith, the actors and others; deleted scenes; outtakes; featurettes and documentaries. But because Smith is a born storyteller and speaker, all the extras are worth a peek.