Book Review: Douglas Coupland, ‘Generation A’

Book Review: Douglas Coupland, ‘Generation A’

Sometimes being wrong is a good thing. Back in January, I created a list of books to watch for in 2009 that I was excited about. Some have come out, some have not. Some have been good, some have not. But also in that list I mentioned a few authors I enjoyed who did not […]

Sometimes being wrong is a good thing. Back in January, I created a list of books to watch for in 2009 that I was excited about. Some have come out, some have not. Some have been good, some have not. But also in that list I mentioned a few authors I enjoyed who did not have 2009 releases, Douglas Coupland being one of them. I am happy to say that Coupland has not only released a book, but he’s released a good book.

Generation A crosses familiar territory for Coupland as it is a thematic follow up to his first book, Generation X. In the world of Generation A, technological communications are king and all bees are dead. Are these things unrelated? When five people are suddenly stung by the extinct insects, they are brought together by the search and find that the digital world is no replacement for real human interaction.

And I write that while acknowledging I am publishing book reviews on a website. Irony…

Inventive but still familiar, Generation A lives up to the standard Coupland has set for himself and is probably his best book since Hey, Nostradamus, though it is not on par as Hey, Nostradamus is simply one of his best. That being said, whether you have read every book by Coupland or this is your first foray into his world, Generation A is a good example of the satirical pop-culturist we have come to know and love.