Movie Review: ‘The Other Guys’

Movie Review: ‘The Other Guys’

The buddy cop movie has been produced to great success many times, with the Lethal Weapon series being a prime example. There is a template that most follow and a short list of scenarios that show up in each. Writer/director Adam McKay was the man behind the widely popular Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy […]

The buddy cop movie has been produced to great success many times, with the Lethal Weapon series being a prime example. There is a template that most follow and a short list of scenarios that show up in each. Writer/director Adam McKay was the man behind the widely popular Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy and Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby. However, in creating The Other Guys, McKay appears to have ignored most of the standards as well as his own recipe for funny.

NYPD Detectives Christopher Danson and P.K. Highsmith (Dwayne Johnson and Samuel L. Jackson) are the baddest and most beloved cops in New York City. Two desks over and one back, sit Detectives Allen Gamble (Will Ferrell) and Terry Hoitz (Mark Wahlberg). They’re not heroes – they’re “the Other Guys.” But every cop has his or her day and soon Gamble and Hoitz stumble onto a seemingly innocuous case no other detective wants to touch, but it could be New York City’s biggest crime.

The first 10 minutes of the film centre on Johnson’s and Jackson’s characters and it’s incredibly amusing as their testosterone-fuelled hijinks cause maximum damage yet collects widespread admiration. They are buddy cops on overdrive, which is a hilarious concept. Then the focus shifts to Ferrell’s and Wahlberg’s characters and the movie goes downhill. There’s no chemistry between the two, the majority of the jokes fall flat but are repeated endlessly, and the story is weak at best. Sadly, even the supporting characters – portrayed by Michael Keaton, Rob Riggle, Damon Wayans Jr., Steve Coogan, Bobby Cannavale and Eva Mendes – do not add enough to save the film.

On the other hand, the soundtrack is an impressive mix of old and new. It’s also possibly the best and most consistent element of the whole film. In addition, the highlight of the movie is a high-speed car chase performed to the song “Monday, Monday” by The Mamas and the Papas.

At nearly two hours, the movie feels like it will never end; consequently never ending the beating of the dead horse. Conversely, the U.S. economic facts displayed during the credits are quite interesting – even more so than the final joke that plays at the end of the credits.